Mod or Standalone?

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Revision as of 05:33, 6 April 2008 by TimeDoctor (talk | contribs) (New page: == Intro == Considerations when deciding to take your mod standalone, or is it better to just make an ioquake3 mod? '''Making a Standalone Game Gets You:''' * Unified Look and Feel: When ...)
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Intro

Considerations when deciding to take your mod standalone, or is it better to just make an ioquake3 mod?

Making a Standalone Game Gets You:

  • Unified Look and Feel:

When players launch your standalone game it will have a unified look & feel from start to finish.

  • Change the Engine Code:

You can make changes to the binary that are incompatible with the ioquake3 scheme. Want raytracing by default? Maybe your own particle system. Go for it with the standalone.

Making an ioquake3 Mod Gets You:

  • Consistent Player Configuration:

A separate game has to be configured separately whereas a mod inherits the initial settings (video mode, key binds) from baseq3

  • Consistent Updates from the Engine

A separate game has to be updated separately ie the user will not benefit from (security) fixes in ioquake3 immediately or ever after the standalone game inevitably stops being updated.

  • Platform Independence

A qvm mod is platform independent, a huge benefit for users of the more exotic platforms/operating systems.